Thursday, November 20, 2008

The Roger Ebert Fan Club

I've been a member of the imaginary Roger Ebert Fan Club since I was a kid reading his reviews in the Chicago Sun-Times. You've probably heard about the salivary gland cancer that robbed him of his voice and his face—but his ability to write and to love movies remains unchanged. Actually, that's not quite true. He recently wrote about how much easier the writing comes to him now, how he's merely transcribing the words that the muse has composed inside his head. (Must reading for any writer.)

Earlier this year, a Sun-Times exec asked Roger to start writing a blog, and that blog kicks ass. I added it to my RSS feed so I never miss a post. The newest one is about looking like the Phantom of the Opera (non-handsome edition) and having been fat. Deep, introspective stuff combined with humor.

He wrote so convincingly about the versatility of rice cookers that I went ahead and bought one. Now what the hell am I supposed to do with it? I should print out Ebert's post and the comments and use that as a cookbook.

Here, see for yourself. Skim through the list of past posts and explore the topics that sound inviting. Hey, a lot of the time, he even writes about movies. (This is in addition to his regular movie review site.)

There's a reason that Ebert is the only movie critic to have won a Pulitzer for his writing, you know.

5 comments:

Roberta Harris said...

Though Ebert recommends against cookbooks, I'm not that creative a cook. I've had good luck with

http://www.amazon.com/Ultimate-Rice-Cooker-Cookbook-Porridges/dp/1558322035/ref=pd_bbs_sr_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1227171565&sr=8-1

The rice cooker is fantastic for leaving things alone in the kitchen and not worrying that the stove will explode (a 3-year-old plus new-ish twins means that all meals must be one-pot and require little monitoring.)

Mary said...

Thanks for pointing this out! I also am a long-time Ebert fan, but did not know about his blog.

I'm looking cautiously at the rice cooker entry. I know these are supposed to be the greatest things ever, but the one time I tried cooking with it (yes, it was only one time - probably not a fair test), something happened, and there was rice and water all over the counter, the cooker was a disgusting mess (easier to throw out than clean and try again) and the rice was not really edible. I realize these are supposed to be fool-proof cooking, and fully accept the blame for it. But, I've been hearing a lot of people lately extolling the virtues of rice cookers, so I'm ever-so-slightly considering getting past my instantly-formed rice cooker phobia and actually purchasing one. (The first one was a gift.) Maybe Ebert can help reintroduce me to rice cookers! :)

I seem to have a knack for screwing up the simple things; my husband does not allow me to make sugar cookies anymore after I screwed up five or six different batches. (Showing creativity - each was terrible in an entirely different way!) Now, I can actually cook, and can make the most fantastic pumpkin dark chocolate chip cookies (healthy things in it = good for me, regardless of the huge sugar and butter amounts!), so I don't know what my problem is. But, I'm thinking I need to put "rice cooker" onto my list for Santa this year...

Becky..AMHW said...

I love my rice cooker.

I put roast beef leftovers in it the other day, with gravy. Mine comes with a steamer basket to put on top of the rice bowl so that's where frozen green beans went. That roast came out more tender than I had originally made it.

I did not know about Ebert. I had a blocked salivary gland last year and though it wasn't cancer I'm sure, my god it was painful. I feel for the man.

Narya said...

I love Roger, too; I've always regarded him as one of my sources. Our tastes differ somewhat (I cannot stand French movies), but he writes so well that I can use what he says.

Anonymous said...

I respect the guy but if someone dies and he is going to say something terrible the day after it happens he has to expect that a lot of people are going to have something to say. And they aren't going to be pleasant.